ChildVoice International THRIVE Project

update

for October 4, 2019

Today’s update is provided by our partners at ChildVoice International, a non-profit organization which, for over twelve years, has been investing in the future of war-affected children and youth through sustainable interventions, research and collaboration, and advocacy. In the Spring of 2016, Legacy Collective awarded a $25,000 grant to ChildVoice to support their THRIVE Project, which teaches girls in refugee settlements how to sew and use reusable menstrual pad kits, and educates them about women’s health and emotional wellness.

Restoring Dignity to Adolescent Girls 

Much progress has been made since receiving the Legacy Grant for the THRIVE Project. 

In the US, we have held eight large-group volunteer sewing days to make THRIVE Pad kits and train people how to make them. These have involved church groups and companies such as Liberty Mutual and Timberland. One local church has held monthly sewing days to make the kits. There have also been several individuals who are sewing kits at home and dropping off the components or mailing them to our office once they are completed.

We have future volunteer days planned with Salesforce and two churches in New Hampshire and will be scheduling more. The response to this project has been very positive and has drawn in many volunteers eager to use their sewing skills toward a project that is so impactful in changing the lives of girls living in refugee or IDP camps. 

We have two volunteer seamstresses who attend the large sewing events and serve as trainers and consultants for those learning to sew the kits.

To develop a standard curriculum for the THRIVE Project, our Programs Consultant has been researching what staff in Uganda at the Imvepi Refugee Settlement and at the Lukome Center are teaching in regards to physical health, psychosocial health and relational well-being, including training about reproductive cycles, vulnerabilities for exploitation, and self-care for a girl’s monthly cycle. Having gathered and documented what our staff are teaching, drafts of curriculum have been formulated and are being reviewed by staff on the ground for approval. Mental Models to help talk about sexual struggles and the self-esteem of a woman have been created and are now being used among both Lukome Center and Imvepi gatherings for awareness and group counseling. 

The current focus is to have the Imvepi staff review and give feedback on the drafts of the curriculum and debrief the mental models utilized as they have been running sessions with the empowerment communities. We are also in the process of finalizing an overview of curriculum points with the counselors and case workers for psychosocial awareness sessions, group counseling sessions, and health/hygiene sessions. 

Next steps are to discuss the current progress happening in Uganda with the Nigeria team, learn what they have been teaching, and merge the two together in order to develop a more holistic and robust curriculum that is culturally appropriate for each context. 

Since receiving the Legacy Collective grant, the following class sessions have been held: 

At Imvepi Refugee Settlement
Sanitation and hygiene – 48
Health education – 17
Pad making – 11

In Nigeria
Sanitation and hygiene – 11
Health education – 6
Pad making – 7

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